Abbonamento a feed Free Software Foundation News
Aggiornato: 5 ore 5 min fa

Free Software Foundation targets Microsoft's smart assistant in new campaign

Mer, 01/04/2020 - 18:10

BOSTON, Massachusetts, USA -- Wednesday, April 1, 2020 -- Today, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) announced plans to follow up their recent campaign to "upcycle" Windows 7 with another initiative targeting proprietary software developer Microsoft, calling on them to Free Clippy, their wildly popular smart assistant. Clippy, an anthropomorphic paperclip whose invaluable input in the drafting of documents and business correspondence ushered in a new era of office productivity in the late 1990s, has not been seen publicly since 2001. Insider reports suggest that Clippy is still alive and being held under a proprietary software license against its will.

The FSF is asking its supporters to rally together to show their support of the industrious office accessory. Commenting on the campaign, FSF campaigns manager Greg Farough stated: "We know that Microsoft has little regard for its users' freedom and privacy, but few in our community realize what little regard they have for their own digital assistants. Releasing Clippy to the community will ensure that it's well taken care of, and that its functions can be studied and improved on by the community."

Undeterred by comments that the campaign is "delusional" or hopelessly idealistic, the FSF staff remains confident that their call to free the heavy-browed stationery accessory will succeed. Yet upon reaching out to a panel of young hackers for comment, each responded: "What is Clippy?"

It's our hope that a little outlandish humor can help others get through increasingly difficult and uncertain times. In lieu of showing your support for Clippy, please consider making a small donation to a healthcare charity or, if you like, the FSF.

Media Contact

Jonathan Tuttle
Office Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Let's Encrypt, Jim Meyering, and Clarissa Lima Borges receive FSF's 2019 Free Software Awards

Dom, 15/03/2020 - 01:55

This year was the first time the FSF offered its Award for Outstanding New Free Software Contributor, a way to commemorate a community member whose first steps into the movement have demonstrated a remarkable commitment and dedication to software freedom.

This year's winner is Clarissa Lima Borges, a talented young Brazilian software engineering student whose Outreachy internship work focused on usability testing for various GNOME applications. Presenting the award was Alexandre Oliva, acting co-president of the FSF and a longtime contributor to crucial parts of the GNU operating system. Clarissa said that she is "deeply excited about winning this award -- this is something I would never have imagined," and emphasized her pride in helping to make free software more usable for a broader base of people who need "more than ever to be in control of the software [they] use, and [their] data." She also emphasized that her accomplishments were dependent on the mentoring she received as part of Outreachy and GNOME: "Every time I thought I had something good to offer the community, I was rewarded with much more than I expected from people being so kind to me in return."

The Award for Projects of Social Benefit is presented to a project or team responsible for applying free software, or the ideas of the free software movement, to intentionally and significantly benefit society. This award stresses the use of free software in service to humanity. Past recipients of the award include OpenStreetMap and Public Lab, whose executive director, Shannon Dosemagen, will be delivering a keynote for the 2020 LibrePlanet conference on Sunday.

This year's honoree is Let's Encrypt, a nonprofit certificate authority that hopes to make encrypted Web traffic the default state of the entire Internet. The award was accepted by site reliability engineer Phil Porada, on behalf of the Let's Encrypt team. Porada said: "I am extremely honored to accept this award on behalf of the Internet Security Research Group (ISRG) and Let's Encrypt. It’s a testament to the teamwork, compassion towards others, patience, and community that helps drive our mission of creating a more secure and privacy-respecting Web."

"As a maker I enjoy taking things apart and putting them back together; be it mechanical, wood, or software. Free software allows us to look deep into the internals of a system and figure out why and how it works. Only through openness, transparency, and accountability do we learn, ask questions, and progress forward."

Josh Aas, executive director of Let's Encrypt, added: "There is no freedom without privacy. As the Web becomes central to the lives of more people, ensuring it’s 100% encrypted and privacy-respecting becomes critical for a free and healthy society." Commenting on Let's Encrypt's receipt of the award, FSF executive director John Sullivan added: "This is a project that took on a problem that so many people and so many large, vested interests said they would never be able to solve. And they tackled that problem using free software and important principles of the free software movement."

The Award for the Advancement of Free Software goes to an individual who has made a great contribution to the progress and development of free software through activities that accord with the spirit of free software. Past recipients of the award include Yukihiro Matsumoto, creator of the Ruby programming language, and Karen Sandler, executive director of Software Freedom Conservancy.

This year's honoree is Jim Meyering, a prolific free software programmer, maintainer, and writer. Presenting the award was Richard Stallman, founder of both the Free Software Foundation and the GNU Project. Receiving his award, Jim wrote, "I dove head-first into the nascent *utils and autotools three decades ago. Little did I know how far free software would come or how it would end up shaping my ideas on software development. From what 'elegant,' 'robust,' and 'well-tested' could mean, to how hard (yet essential) it would be to say 'Thank you!' to those first few contributors who submitted fixes for bugs I'd introduced. Free software has given me so much, I cannot imagine where I would be without it. Thank you, RMS, co-maintainers and our oh-so-numerous contributors."

Due to ongoing worries about the COVID-19 outbreak, the 2020 LibrePlanet conference is being conducted entirely online, utilizing free software to stream the scheduled talks all over the globe, in lieu of the usual in-person conference and awards presentation. The Free Software Award winners will be mailed their commemorative gifts.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at https://fsf.org and https://gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://my.fsf.org/donate. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

John Sullivan
Executive Director
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Photo credits: Free Software Foundation, Inc. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.

Young hackers to deliver opening keynote for LibrePlanet conference

Mer, 04/03/2020 - 22:10

BOSTON, Massachusetts, USA -- Wednesday, March 4, 2020 -- The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announced that the opening keynote for the LibrePlanet 2020 conference will be a panel of impressive young free software community members. The annual technology and social justice conference will be held in the Back Bay Events Center on March 14 and 15, 2020, with the theme "Free the Future."

Online registration is open until March 10, 10:00am Eastern Daylight Time (14:00 UTC); and registration is possible at the event.

The panelists will be Alyssa Rosenzweig, a free software hacker working at Collabora, Taowa, a sysadmin, free software enthusiast, and the youngest (non-uploading) Debian developer, and Erin Moon, whose free software work has focused on federated social media software as a user, contributor, and maintainer.

Alyssa leads the Panfrost project to build a free graphics stack for Mali GPUs, and she is passionate about freedom. She has strong, pointed ideas on what the future of free software is supposed to look like: "Beyond abstract criteria, today's software has profound network effects and psychosocial implications. In the balance is more than software freedom, but also users' entire lives. The need for holistic, optimistic free software is greater than ever," she states.

Greg Farough, campaigns manager at the FSF and moderator of the panel, added: "The continued success of the free software movement depends on its youngest members, so it is time we give them a proper platform. This new generation of freedom-minded developers is incredibly talented, diverse, and forward-thinking. I am convinced they can accomplish everything they set out to do."

The keynote will touch on subjects like optimism in the face of adversity, the social impact of working in free software, and the effect of social change, broadening user bases, and bringing the free software movement beyond the Intel x86 processor architecture. Taowa is excited to weigh in: "A free future is an accessible one. Much like scientific progress is built on what's come before us, technological progress is built on the shoulders of our predecessors. A free present enables a free future, but it isn't going to build itself."

Erin is the developer behind Rustodon, a Mastodon-compatible ActivityPub server. To her, having the panel comment on the future of freedom is a way to represent the meta community of diverging projects. She says: "Together we shape the future of free software and its subcommunities: what projects are prominent, the public image of free software, our culture and social mores. Paneling with people whose work is vastly different from my own is exhilarating! While I'm excited to learn about others' technical work, I'm also connected to them by this meta-community: our shared experiences as people involved with free software."

The panel is the third confirmed keynote for LibrePlanet 2020. It follows the announcement of Brewster Kahle in January, and the more recent announcement of Public Lab's Shannon Dosemagen. The schedule features talks and workshops from a wide and international range of community members. Thousands of people have attended LibrePlanet over the years, both in person and remotely. The conference welcomes visitors from up to fifteen countries each year, with many more joining online. Hundreds of impressive free software speaker sessions from past LibrePlanet conferences, including keynote talks by Micky Metts, Edward Snowden, and Cory Doctorow, can be viewed in the conference's video library.

About LibrePlanet

LibrePlanet is the annual conference of the Free Software Foundation. Over the last decade, LibrePlanet has blossomed from a small gathering of FSF associate members into a vibrant multi-day event that attracts a broad audience of people who are interested in the values of software freedom. LibrePlanet 2020 will be held on March 14 and 15, 2020. To sign up for announcements about LibrePlanet 2020, visit the Web site. To discuss LibrePlanet topics or to get involved, join the discussion list.

Registration for LibrePlanet: "Free the Future" is open through March 10. Attendance is free of charge for FSF associate members and for students.

For information on how your company can sponsor LibrePlanet or have a table in our exhibit hall, email campaigns@fsf.org.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at https://www.fsf.org and https://www.gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

MEDIA CONTACT

Zoë Kooyman
Program Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
info@fsf.org

Environmental activist Shannon Dosemagen joins FSF conference keynote lineup

Ven, 28/02/2020 - 18:00

BOSTON, Massachusetts, USA -- Friday, February 28, 2020 -- The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announced Shannon Dosemagen as the second keynote speaker for LibrePlanet 2020. The annual technology and social justice conference will be held in the Back Bay Event Center on March 14 and 15, 2020, with the theme "Free the Future."

Registration is open until March 10, 10:00am Eastern Daylight Time (15:00 UTC), and limited registration is possible at the event.

Shannon Dosemagen is the second confirmed keynote speaker for the LibrePlanet conference. Dosemagen is the co-founder and current executive director of Public Lab, a nonprofit organization creating local environmental science solutions following the free software philosophy, and winner of the FSF's Award for Projects of Social Benefit. Shannon Dosemagen is an environmental health advocate and a community science champion, and is enthusiastic about free systems and technology that support the creation of a more just and equitable future. She is a previous Fellow at both the Harvard Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, and the Loyola University Environmental Communications Institute. During 2020, she will be a Fellow with the Shuttleworth Foundation, working on a new concept.

At LibrePlanet, Dosemagen will discuss her experience democratizing science to address environmental problem-solving. Her experiences and frustrations doing this work are very familiar to the free software community: "The work I do on the environment and health is being increasingly challenged by environmental deregulation and lack of cooperation. We're also seeing heightened pressure to drastically alter how society functions in an effort to curb the climate crisis. This is a profound moment, and critical to address at an event aptly themed 'Free the Future.'"

"Shannon's work is very important, and is a testament to the success of community collaboration," says Zoë Kooyman, the FSF's program manager. "Public Lab's work towards free hardware solutions is a strong indicator of what the four freedoms can achieve, and how they can work towards a better future outside of software. Shannon is an experienced speaker and organizer, and we are proud to have her keynote at LibrePlanet."

Free technology is creating tangible solutions for many environmental and health issues through Dosemagen's work, and the knowledge and involvement of the wider free software movement are crucial to its success: "The work of LibrePlanet participants has an important role to play in figuring out better systems, structures, and governance models for the environmental health of our communities," Dosemagen states.

The conference schedule features talks and workshops from a wide and international range of community members, including another keynote by Brewster Kahle. Thousands of people have attended LibrePlanet over the years, both in person and remotely. The conference has welcomed visitors from up to fifteen countries each year, with many more joining online. Hundreds of impressive free software speaker sessions from past LibrePlanet conferences, including keynote talks by Edward Snowden, and Cory Doctorow can be viewed in the conference's video library. The conference has also featured many engaging panel sessions, such as a session on free medical devices featuring Rachel Kalmar, Karen Sandler, and Dana Lewis.

About LibrePlanet

LibrePlanet is the annual conference of the Free Software Foundation. Over the last decade, LibrePlanet has blossomed from a small gathering of FSF associate members into a vibrant multi-day event that attracts a broad audience of people who are interested in the values of software freedom. LibrePlanet 2020 will be held on March 14 and 15, 2020. To sign up for announcements about LibrePlanet 2020, visit the Web site. To discuss LibrePlanet topics or to get involved, join the discussion list.

Registration for LibrePlanet: "Free the Future" is open. Through March 10. Attendance is free of charge for FSF associate members, and for students.

For information on how your company can sponsor LibrePlanet or have a table in our exhibit hall, email campaigns@fsf.org.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at https://www.fsf.org and https://www.gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

MEDIA CONTACT

Zoë Kooyman
Program Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Photo Courtesy Nate Dappen/CROWD & CLOUD

GNU-FSF cooperation update

Gio, 06/02/2020 - 23:00

The Free Software Foundation and the GNU Project leadership are defining how these two separate groups cooperate. Our mutual aim is to work together as peers, while minimizing change in the practical aspects of this cooperation, so we can advance in our common free software mission.

Alex Oliva, Henry Poole and John Sullivan (board members or officers of the FSF), and Richard Stallman (head of the GNU Project), have been meeting to develop a general framework which will serve as the foundation for further discussion about specific areas of cooperation. Together we have been considering the input received from the public on fsf-and-gnu@fsf.org and gnu-and-fsf@gnu.org. We urge people to send any further input by February 13, because we expect to finish this framework soon.

This joint announcement can also be read on https://www.gnu.org/gnu/2020-announcement-1.html.

Libiquity Wi-Fri ND2H Wi-Fi card now FSF-certified to Respect Your Freedom

Gio, 30/01/2020 - 21:55

BOSTON, Massachusetts, USA -- Thursday, January 30, 2020 -- The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today awarded Respects Your Freedom (RYF) certification to the Libiquity dual-band 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi card, from Libiquity LLC. The RYF certification mark means that Libiquity's distribution of this device meets the FSF's standards in regard to users' freedom, control over the product, and privacy.

Libiquity currently sells this device as part of its previously-certified Taurinus X200 laptop. Technoethical also offers the same hardware with their RYF-certified Technoethical N300DB Dual Band Wireless Card. With today's certification, Libiquity is able to sell the Libiquity Wi-Fri ND2H Wi-Fi card as a stand-alone product for the first time, and now has two RYF-certified devices available.

"In the years since first joining the RYF program, we at Libiquity have worked to improve and expand our catalog. For anyone looking to join distant or congested 2.4-GHz or 5-GHz wireless networks, the Wi-Fri ND2H is a great internal Wi-Fi card for laptops, desktops, servers, single-board computers, and more. Most importantly, in an era when more and more hardware disrespects your freedom, we're proud to offer a Wi-Fi card branded with the RYF logo on the product itself, as a trusted symbol of its compatibility with free software such as GNU Linux-libre," said Patrick McDermott, Founder and CEO, Libiquity LLC.

With this certification, the total number of RYF-certified wireless adapters grows to thirteen. The Libiquity Wi-Fri ND2H Wi-Fi card enables users to have wireless connectivity without having to rely on nonfree drivers or firmware.

"We are especially glad to see the certification mark printed directly on the product. While not a requirement of the program, this helps us get closer to the world we are aiming for, where people shopping can immediately and easily see what products are best for their freedom," said the FSF's executive director, John Sullivan.

Like other previously certified peripheral devices, the Libiquity Wi-Fri ND2H Wi-Fi card was tested using an FSF-endorsed GNU/Linux distro to ensure that it works using only free software. The device does not ship with any software included, as all the free software needed is already provided by fully free distributions.

"Expanding the availability of hardware that works with fully free systems like Trisquel GNU/Linux is always something to celebrate. It's great to see Libiquity offering this device as a stand-alone product so that users can customize and upgrade their own setup," said the FSF's licensing and compliance manager, Donald Robertson, III.

To learn more about the Respects Your Freedom certification program, including details on the certification of this Libiquity device, please visit https://ryf.fsf.org.

Retailers interested in applying for certification can consult https://ryf.fsf.org/about/vendors.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at https://fsf.org and https://gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

About Libiquity

Founded by CEO Patrick McDermott, Libiquity is a privately held New Jersey, USA company that provides world-class technologies which put customers in control of their computing. The company develops and sells electronics products, provides firmware and embedded systems services, and leads the development of the innovative and flexible ProteanOS embedded operating system. More information about Libiquity and its offerings can be found on its Web site at https://www.libiquity.com.

Media Contacts

Donald Robertson, III
Licensing and Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

Patrick McDermott
Founder and CEO
Libiquity LLC
info@libiquity.com

First LibrePlanet 2020 keynote announcement: Internet Archive founder Brewster Kahle

Mer, 15/01/2020 - 23:41

BOSTON, Massachusetts, USA -- Wednesday, January 15, 2020 -- The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announced Brewster Kahle as its first keynote speaker for LibrePlanet 2020. The annual technology and social justice conference will be held in the Boston area on March 14 and 15, 2020, with the theme "Free the Future." Attendees can register at https://my.fsf.org/civicrm/event/info?id=87&reset=1.

Internet archivist, digital librarian, and Internet Hall of Famer Brewster Kahle has been announced as the first of multiple keynote speakers for the FSF's annual LibrePlanet conference. Kahle is renowned as the founder of the Internet Archive, a nonprofit dedicated to preserving the cultural history of the Web.

With its mission to provide "universal access to all knowledge," the Internet Archive is an inspiration to digital activists from all over the world. Through its "Wayback Machine," the Internet Archive provides historically indexed versions of millions of Web pages. For his work as an Internet activist and digital librarian, Brewster was inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame in 2012.

Commenting on his selection as a LibrePlanet keynote speaker, Kahle said, "Free software is crucial in building a digital ecosystem with many winners. The Internet Archive is completely dependent, as are millions of others, on free software but also free content. I look forward to presenting at LibrePlanet, but mostly from learning from those attending as to where free software is going."

FSF executive director John Sullivan welcomed Kahle's announcement as a keynote speaker by saying, "The Internet Archive plays an important role in our lives, ensuring that Internet users for years to come will be able to view all of the Web exactly as it was at a specific point in history. Our focus at this year's LibrePlanet is to 'free the future,' and Brewster's work reminds all of us that we cannot have a future without a reliable history. The FSF is honored to have Brewster keynoting the conference."

The FSF will announce further keynote speakers before the start of the conference, and the full LibrePlanet 2020 schedule is expected very soon. Thousands of people have attended LibrePlanet over the years: some in person, and some by tuning into the fully free software livestream the FSF has of the event. LibrePlanet has welcomed visitors from up to fifteen countries each year, and individuals from many others participate online. The conference's video archive contains talks recorded throughout the conference's history, including keynote talks by Edward Snowden and Cory Doctorow.

About LibrePlanet

LibrePlanet is the annual conference of the Free Software Foundation. Over the last decade, LibrePlanet has blossomed from a small gathering of FSF associate members into a vibrant multi-day event that attracts a broad audience of people who are interested in the values of software freedom. LibrePlanet 2020 will be held on March 14th and 15th, 2020. To sign up for announcements about LibrePlanet 2020, visit https://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/libreplanet-discuss.

Registration for LibrePlanet: "Free the Future" is open. Attendance is free of charge to FSF associate members and students.

For information on how your company can sponsor LibrePlanet or have a table in our exhibit hall, email campaigns@fsf.org.

Keynote speakers at LibrePlanet 2019 included Bdale Garbee, who has contributed to the free software community since 1979, and Tarek Loubani, who runs the Glia Project, which seeks to provide medical supplies to impoverished locations. The closing keynote was given by Micky Metts, a hacker, activist and organizer, as well as a member of Agaric, a worker-owned cooperative of Web developers.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at https://www.fsf.org and https://www.gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

MEDIA CONTACT

Greg Farough
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Photo by Vera de Kok © 2015. Licensed under CC-BY-SA 4.0.